The Babenhausen Kaserne


          Units on Post

77th Mainenance Company

&

71st Ordnance Company

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18th Support Battalion
77th Maintenance Company
71st Ordnance Company






Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules (Crimson) Thor’s hammer Or. Attached below the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “WE FORGE AHEAD” in Red.

Symbolism
Crimson and yellow are colors representative of the Ordnance Corps, the parent organization. The functions of the former unit are symbolized by the hammer of the Norse god Thor, the mythical blacksmith of the gods, to forge thunder bolts, and who was considered as the god of thunder and lightning. The motto, “We Forge Ahead,” is indicative of the mission of the parent unit and is expressive of the aspirations of the personnel.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 8th Ordnance Battalion on 18 February 1943. It was rescinded on 2 November 1951. It was reinstated on 8 January 1953. It was redesignated for the 8th Maintenance Battalion on 30 November 1965. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Support Battalion with the description and symbolism revised effective 15 July 1993. Distinctive Unit Insignia

Description
A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall consisting of a shield blazoned: Gules (Crimson) Thor’s hammer Or. Attached below the shield a Gold scroll inscribed “WE FORGE AHEAD” in Red.

Symbolism
Crimson and yellow are colors representative of the Ordnance Corps, the parent organization. The functions of the former unit are symbolized by the hammer of the Norse god Thor, the mythical blacksmith of the gods, to forge thunder bolts, and who was considered as the god of thunder and lightning. The motto, “We Forge Ahead,” is indicative of the mission of the parent unit and is expressive of the aspirations of the personnel.

Background
The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 8th Ordnance Battalion on 18 February 1943. It was rescinded on 2 November 1951. It was reinstated on 8 January 1953. It was redesignated for the 8th Maintenance Battalion on 30 November 1965. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Support Battalion with the description and symbolism revised effective 15 July 1993.



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 Coat Of Arms

Blazon
Shield
Gules (Crimson), Thor’s hammer Or.

Crest
None.

Motto
WE FORGE AHEAD.

Symbolism
Shield
Crimson and yellow are colors representative of the Ordnance Corps, the parent organization. The functions of the former unit are symbolized by the hammer of the Norse god Thor, the mythical blacksmith of the gods, to forge thunder bolts, and who was considered as the god of thunder and lightning. The motto, “We Forge Ahead,” is indicative of the mission of the parent unit and is expressive of the aspirations of the personnel.

Crest
None.

Background
The coat of arms was originally approved for the 8th Ordnance Battalion on 18 February 1943. It was rescinded on 2 November 1951. It was reinstated on 8 January 1953. The insignia was redesignated for the 18th Support Battalion with the symbolism revised effective 15 July 1993.







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The History of the


18th Corps Support Battalion

18th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion






The mission of the 18th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion is to rapidly and safely deploy worldwide, providing expeditionary logistics; command and control over the full spectrum of sustainment operations as part of a Battalion, or Theater Sustainment Command operation as directed; and, on order support of US Army Europe deployment and redeployment operations. Prior to its reorganization in 2007, the mission of the 18th Corps Support Battalion had been to provide direct combat service support (supply and maintenance) to non-divisional V Corps units or as part of a contingency operation. The battalion would have also provided reinforcing combat service support to divisional units.

The 18th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion was originally constituted on 16 July 1940 as the 3rd Ordnance Battalion (Maintenance) and activated at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland on 1 July 1941. The unit was redesignated later as the 8th Ordnance Battalion on 11 August 1941. The Battalion arrived in Europe in the spring of 1944 as part of the 51st Ordnance Group and provided support to the First US Army through V-E Day and to the Ninth and Seventh US Armies respectively during the initial occupation. For its distinguished service during World War II, the Battalion was awarded campaign streamers for the Rhineland and Central European campaigns. In Paris, France on 15 December 1946, the unit was inactivated.

 The 8th Ordnance Battalion commenced a new life in Germany when it reactivated on 1 August 1951 in Feundhaven following 4 years of inactivation. The Battalion relocated in May 1955 to Pioneer Kaserne in Hanau, Germany. On 21 May 1956 that the Battalion was transferred to Grossauheim, to what was then known as the Hanau Engineer Depot (renamed Grossauheim Kaserne in 1965).

On 16 August 1965, under the COSTAR Concept, the unit was officially known as the 8th Maintenance Battalion. The unit was further redesignated as the 18th Corps Support Battalion on 15 July 1993. The Battalion relocated to Hutier Kaserne in July 1994.

The 18th Corps Support Battalion played an integral role in logistical support within the 3rd Corps Support Command (COSOM) and throughout central region. The 18th Corps Support Battalion deployed soldiers to Hungary in support of Operation Joint Endeavor and Joint Guard, supported NATO operations as part of Operations Allied Force and Shining Hope in Tirana, Albania; and conducted 3 Kosovo Force (KFOR) rotations at Camp Able Sentry in Macedonia. The 18th Corps Support Battalion received the Army Superior Unit Award while supporting Operation Joint Endeavor from October 1995 through November 1996.

By 2000, the 18th Corps Support Battalion consisted of the Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, the 71st Ordnance Company (Missile Maintenance) and the 77th Maintenance Company. The units were geographically located in Hanau and Babenhausen, Germany. The 71st Ordnance Company provided direct and general support maintenance to non-divisional Avenger and Multiple Launch Rocket System battalions in V Corps. It provides back-up direct and general support and Class IX missile support to divisional units. The 77th Maintenance Company provided direct support maintenance and Class IX repair parts support to non-divisional V Corps units or as part of a contingency operation. The Company also provided reinforcing support to divisional units.

In 2007, as part of the reorganization and redesignation of the 16th Corps Support Group to the 16th Sustainment Brigade, the 18th Corps Support Battalion was similarly reorganized and redesignated as the 18th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion.
The new unit consisted of its Headquarters and Headquarters Company, along with the 12th Chemical Company, 709th Explosive Ordnance Disposal Company, 1st Inland Cargo Transportation Company, 5th Maintenance Company, 23rd Ordnance Company (Ammunition), 574th Quartermaster Company, and 41st Transportation Company (PLS).





Source: globalsecurity.org





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©Tim Beach


©Tim Beach



©Chris Borders

77th MT Office bldg


©Chris Borders

        77th MST



©Chris Borders

         Housing from MST motorpool



©Chris Borders

The 77th NCO Barracks Bldg




77th Maintenance Command Section



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Operation Iraqi Freedom

2003












OIF
-2003-



OIF
-2003-



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A holiday at home
for the 77th



BABENHAUSEN, Germany — Many people joke the Army’s motto should be changed from “An Army of One” to “Hurry Up and Wait.”
One classic example had military families on the receiving end of the stick Wednesday afternoon when their 107 deployed soldiers from the 77th Maintenance Company, part of the 3rd Corps Support Command, returned from a nine-month deployment in Iraq.
A sea of tanned faces and sand uniforms marched toward the Family Support Center to a cheering, parade-like gaggle of wives and children holding American flags, balloons and flowers.
Cries of joy held back tears and confusion raced over some faces trying to recognize family members as the soldiers came to a halt.
As the excitement nearly climaxed in hugs and kisses, soldiers instead filed into the building away from families and friends to be briefed on homecoming procedures. Family members — newborns and all — were ushered upstairs.
Key leaders took about 15 minutes to summarize the deployment. Finally, soldiers were released and family members came back downstairs for the reunion.
There was no running into loved ones' arms or jumping up and down with glee because of the awkwardness of making it down the stairs with small children.
Still, happiness was in the air.


Staff Sgt. Fred Chappell said it was wonderful to be back with his wife, Bernadette, as he hugged her. Asked what plans they had, he said, “Take a long bath together.”
Some daddies saw their children for the first time; newlyweds kissed like it was their wedding day all over again; large families felt complete.
“It’s good my dad is coming back,” said Raymond Gomez, 16. “There’ll be more control in the house.” He said it was hard being the oldest, mature child in the house during the deployment of his father, Sgt. George Gomez.
Others also were relieved to have their spouses back.
“It’s been so hard, I need some rest,” said Marithes Mandig, who was married for only five months before her husband went off to war, and then had to be a first-time mother all alone with a 5-month-old sick child, Martin.
Mandig also said she looks forward to getting to know her husband again.
The Army insists on everyone reuniting the right way, with weekend classes for troops and their families right after Thanksgiving Day.
Chaplain (Maj.) Robert Powers said things such as weight loss or gain and even a different hair color can be difficult to accept during homecomings, but Ladonna Dunham said her change is going to knock the socks off of her man, 2nd Lt. Jermaine Dunham.
“I got out of the Army in August, so he’s never seen me like this before. I’ve put highlights in my hair and I’ve probably lost about 10 to 15 pounds,” she said.


Michael Abrams / S&S
Sgt. Darrick Blackburn gets a laugh as daughter Corrina, 1, tries on his hat as son Garrett, 3, watches.




Michael Abrams / S&S
Sgt. Darrick Blackburn of the 77th Maintenance Company gets a warm hug from his son, Garret, who joined sister Corrina, mom Jolene, and other families and friends in welcoming the 77th home Wednesday.




Michael Abrams / S&S
Members of the 77th Maintenance Company stand in formation after returning to Babenhausen, Germany, from a nine- month deployment to Iraq, as family members and friends wait impatiently on the balcony behind them.




Michael Abrams / S&S
Sisters Katara, Kalia and Ka-imani Burks welcome members of the 77th Maintenance Company home from Iraq at Babenhausen, Germany on Wednesday. The kids were there to greet a family friend.




Used with permission from Stars and Stripes. ©2003,2013 Stars and Stripes











 V CORPS' 77th MAINTENANCE COMPANY
 RETURNS FROM DEPLOYMENT IN
SUPPORT OF OPERATION IRAQI FREEDOM

Release Date: 11/28/2003


By Donna Dean

233rd Base Support Battalion Public Affairs Office


BABENHAUSEN, Germany -- More than 100 Soldiers from VCorps' 77th Maintenance Company, 3rd Corps Support Command, were welcomed home here Nov. 26 after being deployed for eight months in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Excited wives and children carrying signs, flowers and American flags gathered on the sidewalk outside the Army Community Service center on Babenhausen Kaserne to greet their loved ones.

With a military police escort, the Soldiers marched from their motor pool through the base to ACS. With the first glimpse of the unit, family members broke out in cheers and tears flowed. Children jumped up and down and "Daddy!, Daddy!" could be heard from one end of the street to the other.

The unit filed into ACS and stood in formation as family members looked down on the 107 Soldiers from a balcony above. Children jumped and wiggled and moms snapped pictures and waited patiently as Lt. Col. John MacGillis, the 3rd COSCOM rear detachment commander, welcomed the soldiers home and summarized the unit's mission in Iraq.

"77th Maintenance Co. began their move across the Iraqi desert in March and set up at Camp Cedar," MacGillis said. "Within a five-to-six-week period they recovered more than 125 vehicles that had broken down as units moved forward to Baghdad. They supported each other in very harsh conditions." The unit moved on to Camp Dogwood where they stayed until they began the redeploying in October and moved to Taji, north of Baghdad, MacGillis said.

He thanked the families for their patience, support, and the time and energy they spent in sending care packages to the soldiers.

"You are the backbone of what makes our Army great," he told the spouses. "We can go away, do our jobs, and come back knowing that all has been taken care of."

As the patient families sensed that their Soldiers would soon be released to go home, they gathered their belongings and shuffled toward the stairs. As soon as the unit was released, the families ran to greet each other. Daddies held their babies for the first time; and newlyweds, like Spc. David Head and Spc. April Head, started again to build their life together.

"It seems like I haven't seen him forever," April said. "We married on Jan. 17 while stationed at Ft. Polk. David left the end of January for Germany." April stayed at Ft. Polk until August, when she moved to Babenhausen to begin her current job as a chaplain's assistant at the community's chapel.

"It was hard to keep in contact at first," she said. "He called once a month until about August, and then we were able to e-mail each other. We're going to start all over -- start from the beginning."

She says she has nothing to complain about. "I think I did good while he was gone," she said, "and I feel blessed. Some [soldiers] didn't come home alive."

Spc. Mark Shene held his sleeping daughter, Madison, 2 months old, for the first time.

"As soon as he left, I found out I was pregnant," said Rachel Shene. "I went to New York to be with my parents and to have the baby. Since he wasn't going to see her born, I asked my mother-in-law to join my mom [in the delivery room]. I came back to Babenhausen a week ago."

Even with shrieks and laughter emanating throughout the building, Dominik Lipari fell asleep in his father's arms.

"He was only 12 days old when I left," said Capt. Ben Lipari, the 77th's commander. The Liparis said planned to relax over Thanksgiving weekend. "I'm going to let daddy change diapers," laughed Melissa Lipari.






 


77th's return ceremony comes a month
 before unit leaves
Babenhausen


By Matt Millham, Stars and Stripes European edition,
Friday, July 14, 2006


BABENHAUSEN, Germany — The welcome home ceremony for the 77th Maintenance Company on Wednesday could just as easily have been a going away ceremony.

After a yearlong stint in Baghdad, the unit is preparing to shut its doors for good in August.

That doesn’t mean the unit’s soldiers will forget their times with the 77th.

Pfc. Anthony Verrilli, 22, from Hudson, N.H., leaves Wednesday for Fort Stewart, Ga., after a year of fixing road-worn Army trucks into the wee hours of the desert night. The work wasn’t the hard part for Verrilli, who enjoyed turning wrenches to keep the war rolling.

“Being detached from everything, just being detached from normal life, took some getting used to,” he said.

Verrilli and the 224 other soldiers of the 77th logged more than 4,500 work orders as they did everything from fix blown Humvee engines to put armor on Iraqi army trucks. That’s right. Three years ago, the U.S. Army was trying to blow Iraqi trucks to kingdom come; now, they’re putting armor on them to keep Iraqi troops safe.

“We didn’t think about it. They just told us to do it, and we did it,” said Spc. Jeremy Snapp, a welder who worked on some of the 100 Iraqi trucks the unit armored. He said a U.S. Army colonel came by about once a month to tell them their work was saving Iraqi lives. Snapp said it felt good to help the Iraqis.

He also armored a lot of U.S. Army ambulances, which have been targeted by insurgents in the increasingly bloodthirsty war in Iraq.

Most 77th soldiers didn’t get a firsthand look at that side of the war.

Sgt. Aubrey Weaver, 31, from Anderson, Ind., was thankful for that. He deployed to Iraq with the 77th as it took part in the 2003 invasion and lasted just 39 days in the country before a head-on collision nearly took his life.

This deployment was much less eventful, though the time away from his family isn’t something he — or his wife — had to deal with before.

“I was pregnant when he was gone, so it was pretty hard for me,” said Stefanie, Weaver’s wife.

Weaver made it home in the nick of time to catch the Nov. 21, 2005, birth of his son, Brayden. “She went into labor, what was it, eight hours after I got home?” he asked his wife, who nodded in agreement.

While Weaver had a reason to be cautious, others in the unit took a more reckless approach to the deployment, volunteering to pull convoy security and quick-reaction force duties.

Sgt. Jason E. Green, 24, from Chicago, was one of those volunteers. After working as a mechanic during the 2003 deployment, he wanted to get into the action.

There was only one time he regretted the decision. Green was in his Humvee’s turret manning a .50-caliber machine gun when a roadside bomb exploded nearby. He said to himself, “Why did I want to do this?”

But he didn’t quit his volunteer gun truck duty.

“I didn’t want to leave the team,” he said.




Michael Abrams / S&S
Soldiers of the 77th Maintenance Company listen to a speech at the official homecoming ceremony for the unit in Babenhausen, Germany on Thursday. They returned to Germany in April after being deployed to Operation Iraqi Freedom.



Michael Abrams / S&S
Balloons fly at the welcome home celebration for the 77th Maintenance Company at Babenhausen Kaserne, Germany on Thursday



Michael Abrams / S&S
The colors of the 77th Maintenance Company are again flying in Babenhausen, Germany, after they were uncased at the unit's official welcome home ceremony on Thursday.
The 77th, commanded by Capt. Alex Hunt, left, returned from Operation Iraqi Freedom in April. Holding the colors is Spc. John Weiss.



Michael Abrams / S&S
Sgt. Justin Lee of the 77th Maintenance Company sings the Army Song at the conclusion of the welcome home ceremony for the unit on Thursday



Used with permission from Stars and Stripes. ©2006,2013 Stars and Stripes







©233rd BSB




©Stars & Stripes




©233rd BSB
Welcome home DADDY......



©233rd BSB



©233rd BSB

©233rd BSB



©233rd BSB


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Sgt. Melissa Crawford (left) and Spc. Traci Thompson, 77th Maintenance Company, 485th Corps Support Battalion, 16th Corps Support Group, 3rd Corps Support Command, Babenhausen, Germany accept the Supply Excellence Award for Category C, Level II units from Lt. Gen. Michael Dodson, USAREUR deputy commanding general.


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The 77th Maint. supply room door-2011-

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71st Ordnance Inactivation


 

Photo by Dennis Johnson , USAG Hessen Public Affairs
71st Ordnance Company Commander Capt. James M. Gallagher and
 1st Sgt. Henry L. Mims prepare to case the unit colors at the company’s
inactivation ceremony held on the Hutier Kaserne parade grounds in Hanau, Germany on May 2


Hanau company inactivates,
receives OIF recognition



Following a distinguished 65-year history, the 16th Corps Support Group, 485th Corps Support Battalion, 71st Ordnance Company, was once again inactivated on May 2 at a colors casing ceremony at Hutier Kaserne in Hanau, Germany. Led by Company Commander Capt. James M. Gallagher,
and 1st Sgt. Henry L. Mims, the 71st OD Co. marched together across its home parade grounds for the last time.

Since its most recent activation in March 1973, the 71st has supported the1st Armored Division and the 1-27th Field Artillery Battalion based in Babenhausen, Germany.

One focal point of the ceremony was the presentation of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, awarded to the unit for faithfully executing its duties in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from March 2003 to January 2004. Whether conducting its combat mission of providing replacement and repair parts and missile maintenance support, or fulfilling other non-doctrinal but essential tasks, 71st Ordnance clearly reflected its motto of “Consider it Done,” while deployed in Support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.


Mission accomplished

Gallagher recalled his first impression of the 71st, during the ceremony. He said, “When I first came to the 71st Ordnance Company, I immediately realized that it was a different unit. It seemed that everybody in the 485th Corps Support Battalion, and the 16th Corps Support Group for that matter, was either deployed or preparing to deploy. Only the 71st Ordnance Company was slated to stay in Central Region and found itself in the unique circumstances of supporting the deployment of other units while still managing internal
company operations – all with limited support from outside organizations.” The 71st initially deployed to Kuwait
and established the only replacement and repair parts missile supply and support activity in the entire area of operations in Arifjan. When the 1-27th FA BN entered Iraq, the 71st OD Co. 2nd Platoon deployed with their support unit to maintain seamless Multiple Launch Rocket System
repair support, ensuring no fire mission failed because of direct support maintenance faults.
While the 2nd Platoon was taking care of business in Arifjan, the company’s Headquarters and 1st Platoon entered Iraq and established area support for tow, dragon, avenger and Integrated Family of Test Equipment repair from Logistical Support Area Bushmaster. Once major combat operations ended there, the two units relocated to LSA Anaconda in Balad, Iraq, just north of Baghdad, to set up and operate the Corps Distribution Center.
The 71st units in Balad received and distributed thousands of tons of multiclass supply items in support of three combat divisions and two cavalry regiments.After the team successfully received,
downloaded and distributed more than3,600 flatbeds of supplies, the HQ and 1st
Platoon returned to Germany in November2003. The 2nd Platoon redeployed in January 2005. Gallagher said, “When official news of the company’s inactivation came in November 2005, the company met this new challenge head-on and essentially completed a year-long process within 180 days. Undoubtedly, the company blazed the trail and established a standard for company inactivation processes that will be followed and adopted by other units in the future.”














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77th Maintenance Inactivation







 



With a roar,
 77th Maintenance company is
officially inactivated



By Matt Millham, Stars and Stripes
European edition,
Saturday, August 5, 2006


BABENHAUSEN, Germany — A 2006 Harley-Davidson Softail Deluxe whisked away the 77th Maintenance Company’s guidon Friday, moments after the small flag was rolled up for the last time.

This quirky moment was the exclamation point at the end of the unit’s history. The guidon is bound for the National Archives in Washington.

The inactivation of the 77th leaves this nearly deserted post without a single active unit.

Though the order to call it quits wasn’t given until June, rumors of the inactivation had already spread through the ranks by April as the unit prepared to redeploy from its second Iraq tour. That forewarning hasn’t made it easier for Spc. Thomas Sawyer, 20, from Midland, Texas, to say goodbye to the unit.

“I’m about to lose some really great friends that I made,” he said.

The 77th is the only unit he has ever known, having been assigned to it straight out of training. A week after he signed in, he was told he was going to Baghdad.

During that deployment, the 77th completed some 4,500 work orders — 2,500 more than the unit it replaced.

Capt. Alex B. Hunt, a 29-year-old Houston native and commander of the unit, was quick to say that he himself never turned a wrench or filled out a requisition. The impressive record of the 77th was all the soldiers’ doing, he said.

“I’ve never seen anyone accomplish as much as they did with such limited resources,” Hunt said.

The unit earned a Meritorious Unit Citation for its first Iraq deployment. The citation was added to the guidon during the inactivation ceremony, just moments before the casing of the colors.

“It’s sort of sad because we’ve been together for a whole year, and now there’s not going to be anyone in the 77th,” said Spc. Rachel Lewis, 25, from Mars Hill, N.C. She spent her year in Iraq fixing radios, and after the ceremony, was on her way to pick up a set of orders moving her, she hoped, to Hanau.
“We made a good team together,” said company 1st Sgt. Vincent Jefferson, 43, from Houston. In his 21 years in the Army, Jefferson has never had to go through an inactivation. He said almost all of the unit’s equipment has been turned in, which means there’s little left to do except turn over the buildings and help move the soldiers out.

“They’re like my kids,” Jefferson said. “I wish we were all going to the same unit together.”

The inactivation might not be the last nail in the unit’s coffin. Inactivated units can be called back to service at any time.“We made a good team together,” said company 1st Sgt. Vincent Jefferson, 43, from Houston. In his 21 years in the Army, Jefferson has never had to go through an inactivation. He said almost all of the unit’s equipment has been turned in, which means there’s little left to do except turn over the buildings and help move the soldiers out.

“They’re like my kids,” Jefferson said. “I wish we were all going to the same unit together.”

The inactivation might not be the last nail in the unit’s coffin.
Inactivated units can be called back to service at any time.


Michael Abrams / S&S
Sgt. 1st Class Randy Neville carries the cased colors of the 77th Maintenance Company off the field on the back of a 2006 Harley-Davidson Softail Deluxe driven by Staff Sgt. William Cooley at the company’s inactivation ceremony in Babenhausen, Germany, on Friday. At center is 1st Sgt. Vincent Jefferson, who handed Neville the flag.



Michael Abrams / S&S
Company commander Capt. Alex B. Hunt, left, and 1st Sgt. Vincent Jefferson case the colors of the 77th Maintenance Company.



Michael Abrams / S&S
Led by company commander Capt. Alex B. Hunt, the 77th Maintenance Company parades onto the field for the last time as a unit.
Carrying the unit colors is Spc. Joshua Proctor.



Used with permission from Stars and Stripes.
©2006,2013 Stars and Stripes









All photos © VdH Aschaffenburg





































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